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Talk Lists With Me This Thursday

rp_BEA1-1024x750.jpegI’m excited to share this news with you today.  

One of my favorite things about my book, Listful Thinking being published is it’s given me the chance to meet so many of you!

It’s helped me realize there are so many different ways to apply list making to life — it’s not only about being more productive or organized. Lists can help make you less stressed and happier too.  

I’m having another book Q&A and meet and greet this week! It will be on Thursday, April 7th at 6pm at WeWork on East 42nd Street in Manhattan.  You’ll get a copy of Listful Thinking with your ticket!

It’s being hosted by the New York chapter of the National Association of Professional Organizers — NAPO.  My good friend Sandra is a member of the board and will be interviewing me during the event.   We recently went to see Marie Kondo together when she was in NYC.

I will be talking about my inspirations, tips and some of the classic list-making errors at Thursday’s event.

Trust me when you talk about lists all day you hear all the classic mistakes people make. The number one problem is putting everything on the same list!

Over and over I will see a list that goes something like:

  1. Be more confident
  2. Go to Italy
  3. Pick up dry cleaning
  4. Write a book
  5. Email Terri about outline

It might be obvious to some of you that these things don’t belong on the same list, but I see it pretty often.  

Wanting to write a book and pick up your dry cleaning doesn’t belong on the same list.

Just as you can’t lose 10 pounds overnight, you won’t magically become more confident or write a book in the next 24 hours. The truth of this classic list making mistake is that long term plans are scary!

It’s much easier and safer to put this farfetched goal on your daily list and claim you never got round to it, then it is to actually put the planning and effort into achieving something.

Having these good intentions is also a way of procrastinating achieving actual results. Something as simple as having a daily list and a long term goals list separately can help you to shift this mentality.

At my Q&A I’ll go into more details about the different lists you can use for all aspects of your life.  And I’ll talk about outsourcing and my favorite productivity apps too.

I’d love to see you there. Click here to RSVP and get your ticket.

5 List-Making Tricks

81tRJpB37MLLists can be useful to people in lots of different ways. I use lists to help me be more organized and more productive, but that’s not their only purpose. Lists can be an investigation into your ideas or priorities. They can be a way to help you de-stress at the end of the day.

That’s how my friend author Brett Blumenthal uses her lists. She goes into detail about this in her book 52 Small Changes For The Mind.  When you’re feeling overwhelmed by a seemingly endless number of tasks, writing a list can give you a sense of control over the situation.

Here are some of Brett’s top list-making tips from her book, which I urge you to check out:

Keep It Simple – The more complicated you make lists, the less likely you are to follow it. Overstuffing lists causes stress and confusion and may even sabotage your efforts to get things done. Of course it’s important not to go the other way and be to vague about your tasks. For larger issues it’s important to to break it down into smaller tasks. For example ‘lose weight’ isn’t a task, it’s a goal that can be broken down into tasks. As you make progress with each smaller task, you will stay motivated to keep forging ahead to complete your goal. Read more

Why Being Nosy Makes You Unproductive

cultura-organizationala-doru-dimaI’m a naturally curious person. You might call it nosy, but I don’t see it that way.

I’m just interested in what’s going on around me. It’s why I love people watching so much and it’s also probably the reason why I went into journalism.

The problem is sometimes this curiosity can be a hinderance. When you want to be in the know about everything… well it’s a lot of research. Sometimes I get so wrapped in things I don’t even care about, because I’m interested to see if it might lead somewhere good.

So I’m taking a stand and trying to cut these nosy time wasters out of my life.  Check out my list – maybe you are guilty of dilly dallying with these tasks too: Read more

Guess Who Made It Onto Oprah’s List?

Oprah-Winfrey-Desktop-Wallpapers9As regular readers of this blog will know I’m a huge fan of Oprah. So I was very excited to have my book featured at Oprah.com.  You can find the article here that is titled 6 Self Help Books That Actually Help.  Listful Thinking is number 3 on that list!

The article explains how you can use lists to find your true priorities. Everyone has made a pro/con list, but that doesn’t mean everyone has made a good list! As the article points out it’s important to factor every little detail into the decision making process.

Being featured in Oprah’s book club really feels like a full circle moment for me. Especially given that it’s almost exactly a year ago that I went to Oprah’s ‘The Life You Want Weekend‘ and I started this blog right as I went to one of the final tapings of The Oprah Winfrey Show in Chicago.

Now I can look back and smile knowing how far I have come and how far this blog and my book have come.  It’s true what Oprah says, “luck is where planning meets opportunity”.

How To Read Twice As Much In Half The Time

girl-791686_1280I love reading. I’ve always been a book worm.  In school I would start a new book every few days.

While I still try to read as much as possible, I’m a little ashamed to admit down to about one book a month (if that!)

The slower I progress through my book list, the more guilty I feel.

The problem with reading is that it doesn’t really fit in with our “on-the-go” lifestyle. You can’t read a book while you walk (unless you are exceptionally talented). Which is why I’ve started listening to audio books.

When you’re no longer constrained to sitting down to read, it’s much easier to make time to learn something new or escape to a far off land in a book.   Read more